TRAVEL BLOG 15/10/2018
CROATIA PART 2

 

Eating out in Split is easy. There are a fantastic variety of restaurants and cafes within a tiny area, so you can’t go far wrong. I sampled a few that definitely deserve a mention.

After dropping off some of our group at the airport. A friend and I decided to indulge ourselves in a brunch as a reward for rolling out of bed at such an early hour.  So we headed towards the harbour area one glorious morning at nine o’clock. Brasserie 7, which is amongst the nicer end of the portside restaurants in Split, provided the perfect solution. Fresh invigorating juices, hot coffee, French toast with maple syrup and a full English to revive us sufficiently for a full day of sightseeing. It wasn’t the cheapest meal but it set us up for the day, which was exactly what we needed.

After Brunch, lunchtime is my second favourite mealtime. Especially when the sun is shining, which thankfully it did most of the time in Croatia. One particular glorious lunchtime was spent under the awnings of the Corto Maltese. Unusually for me, I was escaping the heat of the day, so something light and tasty was needed. At this restaurant, Freestyle food is a speciality. Their light touch with the flavours and fresh local ingredients was certainly something worth savouring, and I did.

In contrast, my second notable lunchtime in Split was spent sheltering from an almighty squall in the bay. The Bokeria kitchen & wine bar* is now my favourite restaurant in Split. After ten years of living in France, I love wine. I had been told by an acquaintance who runs a vineyard in Cornwall that Croatian wine was very good. I now completely to agree. The best glass of red wine I sampled during my time in Croatia was at The Bokeria. The Plavac Mali was the suggestion from the waiter to accompany my flavoursome, beef cheek and chateaubriand risotto. Comfort food and wine, perfect for a rainy day. As you can imagine, I lingered as long as I possibly could.

 

*Bokeria is also perfect for anyone with a food allergy too as the menu has a number rating system similar to the one used in Ireland to identify any troublesome ingredients.